Jessica Hagedorn was born and raised in the Philippines and came to the United States in her early teens. Her novels include Dream Jungle, The Gangster Of Love, which was nominated for the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, and Dogeaters, which was nominated for a National Book Award.
Hagedorn is also the author of Danger And Beauty, a collection of poetry and prose, and the editor of Charlie Chan Is Dead: An Anthology of Contemporary Asian American Fiction and Charlie Chan Is Dead 2: At Home In The World. Her poetry, plays and prose have been anthologized widely.
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Jessica Hagedorn was born and raised in the Philippines and came to the United States in her early teens. Her novels include Dream Jungle, The Gangster Of Love, which was nominated for the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, and Dogeaters, which was nominated for a National Book Award.

Hagedorn is also the author of Danger And Beauty, a collection of poetry and prose, and the editor of Charlie Chan Is Dead: An Anthology of Contemporary Asian American Fiction and Charlie Chan Is Dead 2: At Home In The World. Her poetry, plays and prose have been anthologized widely.


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Dayanita Singh’s photographic work often presents a curious view of the seemingly everyday. Her recent projects use the possibilites and peculiarities of colour film to produce lush photographs saturated with intense colour. These works present a landscape which exists as much in the artist’s imagination as in the real world. Publishing is also a significant part of the artist’s practice: in her books, often published without text, Singh experiments with different ways of producing and viewing photographs
(Read More Here!)

Dayanita Singh’s photographic work often presents a curious view of the seemingly everyday. Her recent projects use the possibilites and peculiarities of colour film to produce lush photographs saturated with intense colour. These works present a landscape which exists as much in the artist’s imagination as in the real world. Publishing is also a significant part of the artist’s practice: in her books, often published without text, Singh experiments with different ways of producing and viewing photographs


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Sara Rahbar pursued an interdisciplinary study program in New York from 1996-2000 and also studied at Londons Central Saint Martins College of Art and design from 2004- 2005.
Her work ranges from photography to sculpture to installation and always stems from her personal experiences and is largely autobiographical. The first body of work that created international recognition for the artist was the flag series (2005-2011), in which traditional fabrics and objects are reworked as collages that form various incarnations of the American and Iranian flag, exploring ideas of national belonging, as well as the conflicting role of flags as symbols of ideological and nationalistic violence.
Rahbars work has been widely shown internationally, including Cairo, Mumbai, Dubai, Madrid, Vienna, Moscow, New York, London and Paris and is held in multiple collections worldwide, including the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Saatchi Collection in London, The Burger Collection in Hong Kong, the Devi Art Foundation in Gurgaon India and The National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts.
(Read More Here!)

Sara Rahbar pursued an interdisciplinary study program in New York from 1996-2000 and also studied at Londons Central Saint Martins College of Art and design from 2004- 2005.

Her work ranges from photography to sculpture to installation and always stems from her personal experiences and is largely autobiographical. The first body of work that created international recognition for the artist was the flag series (2005-2011), in which traditional fabrics and objects are reworked as collages that form various incarnations of the American and Iranian flag, exploring ideas of national belonging, as well as the conflicting role of flags as symbols of ideological and nationalistic violence.

Rahbars work has been widely shown internationally, including Cairo, Mumbai, Dubai, Madrid, Vienna, Moscow, New York, London and Paris and is held in multiple collections worldwide, including the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Saatchi Collection in London, The Burger Collection in Hong Kong, the Devi Art Foundation in Gurgaon India and The National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts.

(Read More Here!)

WOMAN by Etta James

Today just seems like an Etta James type of a day

str8nochaser:

bettystoner:

str8nochaser:


Yemaya

oh Hey Starbucks! Copycats

actually.. it’s known that starbucks’ logo is inspired by the book moby dick and some character.. i’m guessing this is her.. not so much “copycats”.. but.. whatever..
i don’t even drink that shit, just wanted to say this

Lord… gotta teach. 
Yemeya (or Yemaja) is NOT some character in a book. She is an orisha— a goddess of traditional Yoruba religion that was brought by the enslaved Africans of what is now Nigeria to the west. Yemeya is the Mother. She is the patron of women, in particular, pregnant women. She is the “mother whose children number as the fish in the sea” and that is why she is presented as a two-tailed mermaid.The Orishas have been folded in with Christianity in the African Diaspora, particularly Brazil and Cuba (called Santeria).
She is a way enslaved Africans and their descendants remained connected to their ancestry, and now she’s been commodified by Starbucks. So please, don’t relegate her to “some character in Moby Dick.”

str8nochaser:

bettystoner:

str8nochaser:

Yemaya

oh Hey Starbucks! Copycats

actually.. it’s known that starbucks’ logo is inspired by the book moby dick and some character.. i’m guessing this is her.. not so much “copycats”.. but.. whatever..

i don’t even drink that shit, just wanted to say this

Lord… gotta teach. 

Yemeya (or Yemaja) is NOT some character in a book. She is an orisha— a goddess of traditional Yoruba religion that was brought by the enslaved Africans of what is now Nigeria to the west. Yemeya is the Mother. She is the patron of women, in particular, pregnant women. She is the “mother whose children number as the fish in the sea” and that is why she is presented as a two-tailed mermaid.The Orishas have been folded in with Christianity in the African Diaspora, particularly Brazil and Cuba (called Santeria).

She is a way enslaved Africans and their descendants remained connected to their ancestry, and now she’s been commodified by Starbucks. So please, don’t relegate her to “some character in Moby Dick.”

(Source: the-torch-bearer)

Happy Birthday, Frida Kahlo!

Today marks the birth of Frida Kahlo, a Mexican artist celebrated for her dedication to indigenous tradition and female expression. The painter, whose two best accessories were her unruly brows (not to mention a neck-adorning monkey), would turn 105 if she were magically still alive today.

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Group shot from our closing reception last night! More photos can be found here

Group shot from our closing reception last night! More photos can be found here

"Japanese culture has become too clean. Our five senses are too blunt," says artist Fuyuko Matsui in a recent interview at the Yokohama Museum of Art. “I think Japan needs some fear to stimulate the sense of pain.”
Matsui’s works, undoubtably deliver a sense of pain and horror to the viewer. An artist highly skilled in nihonga (Japanese painting) techniques, she sets herself apart from others in the genre with her unsettling subject matter. Eerie images of female yūrei (ghosts of vengeful souls) and supernatural dissections are frequently found throughout Matsui’s first major solo exhibition, which covers the initial 10 years of her career.
(Read More Here!)

"Japanese culture has become too clean. Our five senses are too blunt," says artist Fuyuko Matsui in a recent interview at the Yokohama Museum of Art. “I think Japan needs some fear to stimulate the sense of pain.”

Matsui’s works, undoubtably deliver a sense of pain and horror to the viewer. An artist highly skilled in nihonga (Japanese painting) techniques, she sets herself apart from others in the genre with her unsettling subject matter. Eerie images of female yūrei (ghosts of vengeful souls) and supernatural dissections are frequently found throughout Matsui’s first major solo exhibition, which covers the initial 10 years of her career.


(Read More Here!)

coolchicksfromhistory:

Actress Lee Yo-Won portraying Queen Seondeok of Silla.  The TV series can be watched on Hulu (Korean with English subtitles).
The daughter of a king with no sons, Queen Seondeok was selected by her father to rule the kingdom of Silla (southeastern Korea).  Seondeok ruled from 632 to 647, keeping the kingdom together despite attempted invasions from neighboring kingdoms. She also built Cheomseongdae, the first observatory in East Asia.  
Queen Seondeok’s successful reign paved the way for two additional queen regents in Silla: Jindeok (647-654) and Jinseong (887-897).

coolchicksfromhistory:

Actress Lee Yo-Won portraying Queen Seondeok of Silla.  The TV series can be watched on Hulu (Korean with English subtitles).

The daughter of a king with no sons, Queen Seondeok was selected by her father to rule the kingdom of Silla (southeastern Korea).  Seondeok ruled from 632 to 647, keeping the kingdom together despite attempted invasions from neighboring kingdoms. She also built Cheomseongdae, the first observatory in East Asia.  

Queen Seondeok’s successful reign paved the way for two additional queen regents in Silla: Jindeok (647-654) and Jinseong (887-897).

coolchicksfromhistory:

Young widow Yvonne Roques worked with Bishop Paul Rémond in Nice to hide approximately a hundred Jewish children during World War II.  Yvonne’s home served as a way station before more permanent hiding places were found.   Unable to remember the names of all the children she saved, Yvonne shared the photos above with Yad Vashem in hopes of identifying these children.  If you recognize any of these children or are interested in seeing more of Yvonne’s unidentified photos, visit Yad Vashem’s website.